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EU External Affairs after Brexit

Development
European Union
Foreign Policy
NATO
Security
Brexit
P023
Monika Sus
Hertie School
Lisa ten Brinke
The London School of Economics & Political Science
Nicola Chelotti
Loughborough University

Building: 9RC, Room: 933

Thursday 11:15 - 13:00 (14/06/2018)


Abstract

This panel features papers that deal with the tangled picture of the post-Brexit European Union’s external policies. Despite the Brexit talks have not focused on these policies, owing to the lack of salience held by foreign affairs in the referendum campaign and the perception (on both sides) that the divorce will be easier to manage in this area than others. Yet it is evident that Brexit will have significant effects for EU foreign, security and defence policy. The UK possesses considerable resources in this area – close to full spectrum military capabilities, substantial latent capabilities, and prestigious international networks and organisational memberships – which will formally cease to be part of the EU. Britain has also been a significant contributor to the EU budget. On the other hand, Brexit will mean that the main opponent of deeper cooperation within security and defence will be no longer able to block the advances in this policy. At the same time, there are ‘known unknowns’: future cooperation between EU and UK within the development aid, the question of the London's engagement in the Union’s neighbourhood policy, the involvement of British troops in the CSDP operations – are just a few examples. We acknowledge the limitations of any attempt to understand such a multifaceted and future-looking question as the impact of Brexit on the future of European security. Yet, in our view sufficient time has now passed since earlier assessments were penned such that a clearer understanding of the likely course of future developments may be possible. Through the various aspects of the post-Brexit EU external policies covered by papers presented in this panel, we try to offer new insights on the impact of Brexit on EU external policies and its consequences.

Title Details
Common Foreign and Security Policy after Brexit: Intergovernamentalism and Atlanticism After All – The Portuguese Case View Paper Details
Smaller EU Members and the EU's CSDP after Brexit: Navigating in the New Environment View Paper Details
‘Known Unknowns’: EU External Action after Brexit – Answering Four Big Questions View Paper Details
EU Development Policy Post Brexit View Paper Details
Still Punching Above its Weight? Britain, the EU and the Politics of Foreign Policy Divorce View Paper Details